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Article: Brachiopods from the Byrd Group (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica: biostratigraphy, phylogeny and systematics

Papers in Palaeontology - Volume 6 Issue 3 - Cover
Publication: Palaeontology
Volume: 6
Part: 3
Publication Date: August 2020
Page(s): 349 383
Author(s): Thomas M. Claybourn, Christian B. Skovsted, Lars E. Holmer, Bing Pan, Paul M. Myrow, Timothy P. Topper, and Glenn A. Brock
DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1295
Addition Information

How to Cite

CLAYBOURN, T.M., SKOVSTED, C.B., HOLMER, L.E., PAN, B., MYROW, P.M., TOPPER, T.P., BROCK, G.A. 2020. . Papers in Palaeontology, 6, 3, 349-383. DOI: /doi/10.1002/spp2.1295

Author Information

  • Thomas M. Claybourn - Department of Biological Sciences Macquarie University North Ryde Sydney NSW 2109 Australia
  • Thomas M. Claybourn - Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology Uppsala University Villavägen 16 Uppsala SE‐75236 Sweden
  • Christian B. Skovsted - Department of Palaeobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Box 50007 Stockholm SE‐10405 Sweden
  • Christian B. Skovsted - State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life & Environments & Department of Geology Northwest University Xi'an 710069 China
  • Lars E. Holmer - Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology Uppsala University Villavägen 16 Uppsala SE‐75236 Sweden
  • Lars E. Holmer - State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life & Environments & Department of Geology Northwest University Xi'an 710069 China
  • Bing Pan - Department of Palaeobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Box 50007 Stockholm SE‐10405 Sweden
  • Bing Pan - State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology & Stratigraphy & Centre for Excellence in Life & Paleoenvironment Nanjing Institute of Geology & Palaeontology Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing 210008 China
  • Bing Pan - University of Science & Technology of China Hefei 230026 China
  • Paul M. Myrow - Department of Geology Colorado College Colorado Springs CO 80903 USA
  • Timothy P. Topper - Department of Palaeobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Box 50007 Stockholm SE‐10405 Sweden
  • Timothy P. Topper - State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life & Environments & Department of Geology Northwest University Xi'an 710069 China
  • Glenn A. Brock - Department of Biological Sciences Macquarie University North Ryde Sydney NSW 2109 Australia
  • Glenn A. Brock - State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life & Environments & Department of Geology Northwest University Xi'an 710069 China

Publication History

  • Issue published online: 18 July 2020
  • Manuscript Accepted: 28 October 2019
  • Manuscript Received: 16 May 2019

Funded By

Vetenskapsrådet. Grant Numbers: 2009‐4395, 2010‐6176, 2012‐1658
Swedish Polar Secretariat in collaboration with the United States Antarctic Program and US National Science Foundation (NSF)
Antarctica by a Trans‐Antarctic Association Grant

Online Version Hosted By

Wiley Online Library
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Abstract

Brachiopods from Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4 carbonate strata of the Byrd Group in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica, are described for the first time. These include six lingulate, one paterinate and one rhynchonelliform taxon, including the new lingulate brachiopod Plicarmus wildi gen. et sp. nov. The biostratigraphy correlates closely to the brachiopods recently reported from the Xinji Formation (Shuiyu section) in North China, as well as brachiopods recovered from the Dailyatia odyssei Zone across the Arrowie Basin of South Australia. These findings also support the previously identified close palaeobiogeography of these regions. The first unambiguous example of the acrotretid brachiopod Eohadrotreta zhenbaensis Li & Holmer outside South China is also identified in the context of its ontogenetic stages. Well‐preserved specimens of the acrotheloid Schizopholis yorkensis (Holmer & Ushatinskaya) facilitate a new reconstruction of its musculature and visceral region. These data are synthesized into a new cladistic analysis that resolves Acrotheloidea as a well‐supported monophyletic clade and supports previous hypotheses of a morphocline in acrotheloid evolution.

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