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Article: Well‐developed muscle attachments in British Albian inoceramids (Inoceramidae, Bivalvia): implications for inoceramid palaeobiology, evolution and taxonomy

Papers in Palaeontology - Volume 5 Issue 3 - Cover
Publication: Palaeontology
Volume: 5
Part: 3
Publication Date: August 2019
Page(s): 461 481
Author(s): Robin I. Knight, and Noel J. Morris
DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1246
Addition Information

How to Cite

KNIGHT, R.I., MORRIS, N.J. 2019. Well‐developed muscle attachments in British Albian inoceramids (Inoceramidae, Bivalvia): implications for inoceramid palaeobiology, evolution and taxonomy. Papers in Palaeontology, 5, 3, 461-481. DOI: /doi/10.1002/spp2.1246

Author Information

  • Robin I. Knight - Department of Earth Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road London SW7 5BD UK
  • Noel J. Morris - Department of Earth Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road London SW7 5BD UK

Publication History

  • Issue published online: 20 July 2019
  • Manuscript Accepted: 15 August 2018
  • Manuscript Received: 15 November 2017

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Wiley Online Library
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Abstract

Well‐developed muscle scars and associated thickened myostracum preserved in the umbones of phosphatized Gnesioceramus anglicus (Woods) provide insights into the palaeobiology of the Inoceramidae. Deeply anchored pedo‐byssal (anterior and posterior) and gill retractor muscle scars are identified amongst the umbonal scars. Comparison with modern bivalves indicates that the remainder of the umbonal scars, and other deeply incised muscle scars around the pallial line in G. anglicus were attachment sites for mantle muscles that were used to aid soft‐part manipulation. Unusually thick umbonal pallial myostracum in G. anglicus, comprising stacked growth increments, indicates that the mantle musculature was well developed and strongly anchored, and therefore that inoceramid soft tissues represented a significant body mass. This suggests that the complex gill, with unusual number of filament components per plica, observed in gigantiform inoceramids, may have also been present in moderate‐sized species of the family. The muscle scars observed in G. anglicus and Actinoceramus concentricus (Parkinson) are found in several extant families within the Pteriomorphia, notably Isognomonidae and Pteriidae, further strengthening the argument for their place in this infraclass. More specifically this is additional evidence for the Inoceramidae being part of the Ostreida. However, the muscle scar organization observed in this study does not provide further evidence in the conundrum that is the superfamily affiliations of this family.

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