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PhD Opportunities

This lists details the PhD projects that we are aware of. They are by no means exhaustive and the institutions listed, and others, may well be offering additional projects. Further details for many of these projects are already available on institutional websites. Note that application deadlines can be as early as January, and interviews usually take place during the period January-April.

To add a PhD opportunity please use our online form: Add a PhD Opportunity.

Notices with expiry dates before this date are not shown.
You may filter by the project funding statues.
Institution: Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen/Geozentrum Nordbayern
Supervisor(s): Prof. Dr. Manuel Steinbauer (GeoZentrum Nordbayern)
Funding Status: Funding is in place for this project
Description: We welcome a new PhD candidate with general interests in marine palaeobiology who is open to develop his/her project interacting with us. A possible research topic might relate to exploring intrinsic limits of diversification and/or the stability of macroecological patterns through deep time. Own project ideas are welcome. Applicants should hold a M.Sc. in palaeobiology or a related field. The successful candidate should have scientific writing skills and knowledge of advanced statistical methods and programming in R. Experience in analyses and mining of large fossil databases is required. More information...
Expiry Date: Wednesday, December 20, 2017
Institution: University of Bristol
Supervisor(s): Prof Emily Rayfield (University of Bristol), Dr Chrissy Hammond (University of Bristol), Prof Richie Gill (University of Bath), Prof Kate Robson Brown (University of Bristol), Dr William Holmes (University of Glasgow)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: The shape of the vertebrate skull is dictated by genetic and environmental factors. Whilst we are beginning to unravel the genetic contribution, we still understand little about how environmental factors such as mechanical loads influence skeletal development and form. Nowhere is this more evident than in the vertebrate skull, where intrinsic mechanical loads are generated during embryonic development via adductor muscle contraction and the expanding braincase. More information...
Expiry Date: Monday, December 25, 2017
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Neil Davies (University of Cambridge)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Amongst many abiotic-biotic feedbacks observable in modern environments, one crucial role is that which plants play in moderating processes and landforms in rivers. Studies into such modern interactions commonly cite a geological observation that ancient rivers left a fundamentally different sedimentary record prior to the evolution of land plants. However, Earth's oldest vegetation was dominated by extinct lineages, with physiological traits and environmental effects that may not fully be analogous to modern flora. More information...
Expiry Date: Thursday, January 4, 2018
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Neil Davies (University of Cambridge)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Mudrock is a crucial geological lithology, both as an archive of sedimentary environments and a regulating component of the Earth system (sequestering chemically-weathered clays). Ongoing research suggests the deposition of mudrock throughout Earth history has not been uniformitarian: the evolution of land plants in the Palaeozoic provided the means of both producing more mud through weathering, and retaining more mud in sedimentary conduits (rivers) through binding and baffling. More information...
Expiry Date: Thursday, January 4, 2018
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Alex Liu (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences), Dr Neil Davies (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences), Dr Milene Figueiredo Freitas (Petrobras, Brazil)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Importance of the area of research: More information...
Expiry Date: Friday, January 5, 2018
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Neil Davies (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences), Dr Alex Liu (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Importance of the area of research: More information...
Expiry Date: Friday, January 5, 2018
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Alex Liu (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences), Prof. Nick Butterfield (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Fossils of the Ediacaran macrobiota are found globally in strata of ~580-541 million years in age, and offer a remarkable record of the early evolution of complex, macroscopic organisms. The precise phylogenetic positions of many Ediacaran taxa remain uncertain, but determination of Ediacaran biological affinities is critical to our understanding of two key evolutionary events, namely the rise of complex multicellularity, and the origin and early diversification of animals. More information...
Expiry Date: Friday, January 5, 2018
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Alex Liu (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences), Prof. Dmitriy Grazhdankin (Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, Novosibirsk, Russia)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Importance of the area of research: More information...
Expiry Date: Friday, January 5, 2018
Institution: University of Cambridge
Supervisor(s): Dr Alexander Liu (University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences), Prof. Paulo Boggiani (Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Geociências, Departamento de Geologia Sedimentar e Ambiental), Prof. Juliana de Moraes Leme (Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Geociências, Departamento de Geologia Sedimentar e Ambiental)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: Importance of the area of research: More information...
Expiry Date: Friday, January 5, 2018
Institution: Imperial College London
Supervisor(s): Dr Philip Mannion (Imperial College London), Dr Diego Pol (Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio, Trelew, Argentina), Dr Samuel Turvey (Zoological Society of London)
Funding Status: Funding is in competition with other projects and students
Description: The 24 species of living crocodylians (alligators, caimans, crocodiles and gavials) are the remnants of a once much more diverse and widespread clade, Crocodylomorpha. One crocodylomorph group, Notosuchia, which went extinct ~10 million years ago (Ma), was especially diverse on the southern continents (South America, Africa, Indo-Madagascar) during the middle–Late Cretaceous (120–66 Ma), including hyper-carnivorous and even herbivorous species. Unusually for crocodylomorphs, many of these terrestrial species lived in hot, arid environments. More information...
Expiry Date: Tuesday, January 9, 2018

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